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International Primary Curriculum

The 10 things that IPC can teach your child

  1. The International Primary Curriculum is followed in 1,000 schools in 65 countries around the world. It was launched in 2000 after three years of development by a group of outstanding experts in children’s learning from different countries.
  2. The goal of IPC is to get children to focus on a combination of academic, personal and international learning. We want our children to enjoy learning, to develop inquisitive minds and the confidence they need to become good citizens of the world. Children develop a sense of their own nationality and culture while maintaining a profound respect for other nationalities and cultures.
  3. Children learn in a series of work units. Each unit is based on a topic of interest that is relevant to children today, such as: Human Beings, Climate Control and Feeling the Force. Each work unit involves between four and eight hours of work on average, and the children study many of their subjects within a common topic, so that their learning is relevant to them.

Personal objectives

  1. Linking the subjects means that our children can make plenty of connections as they learn. We now know that the more connections there are in the brain, the better the child’s capacity to learn.
  2. Developing skills is a very important part of IPC. This also applies to the personal learning goals, which boost our children’s capacities for adaptation, perseverance, consideration, cooperation and respect.
  3. The IPC is not just about learning topics. Although learning is based on topics, the results of learning are broad enough to ensure that our children are learning exactly what they need to.
  4. The IPC focuses on a combination of knowledge, skills and comprehension. Nobody can accurately predict what kind of work and life opportunities our Primary children will come across as adults. Many of the jobs they will have do not exist today, especially in the areas of ITC, technology and science. The IPC therefore takes a skills-based approach to teaching children to be adaptable and flexible and have a global outlook. Children are prepared to live and work in a world in constant change.
  5.  The IPC was designed to work with children of all levels with all kinds of learning styles, and to encourage group learning as well as individual learning.
  6. Parents are sent a letter at the start of each IPC unit to let them know what their children will be studying. It explains the content of the programme and how the parents can help from home if they want to. This starts from the second term.
  7. The continuous development of the IPC ensures that children are studying a curriculum that is up to date and highly relevant, based on the latest research in brain function and children’s learning.